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How To Order Commercial Door Kickplates

Finding the correct commercial grade kick plate may seem like an easy task, but with further investigation may prove to be a difficult one if you don't know the proper questions to ask.

What is the door width?
Your commercial door width will play a major role in what size kick plate can be outfitted on your door.

Is your door fire rated?
With little effort, thousands of kick plates can be found online. But did you know majority of the kickplates listed online are not fire rated and do not have UL certification. You might ask why this matters. If you are commercial building owner chances are you want to meet ANSI standards, proper fire code, and ADA compliance. Installing an inferior product which does not have these certifications can result in failed building and fire codes, resulting in you having to purchase a new compliant product. If you are not sure if your door is fire rated, simply open your door and look at the hinge side of the door. There should be a label with the fire rating.

What side of the door is the kick plate going to be installed on? The Push side or Pull side?
Depending on what side you plan to install the kick plate, will determine the proper width of the kick plate.

Kickplates Installed on the push side of the door:
For example, as a general rule of thumb if the kick plate is installed on the push side of the door then the proper width of the kick plate should be about 2" less than the total width of the door. This is important because the measurement takes into account the door frame's rabbet or profile. Too wide of a kick plate will hit the door frame's rabbet, causing the door not to close properly.



Kick plates Installed on the pull side of the door:
If your kick plate is installed on the pull side of the door, then the kick plate width is typically about 1-1/2" less than the total width of the door. This is because on the pull side of the door, the door frame's rabbet is not visible and is on the opposite side of the door frame, allowing for a wider surface to mount a kick plate.