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Types Of Storefront Door Locks

A storefront door lock is a mechanism which is mortised into the door's lock stile and is designed to project a bolt into the door frame jamb to keep the door secured within the frame. Storefront door locks vary in design but all function with one same goal, and that is to keep the door locked. In this article we explain the different types of storefront door locks.

Deadlock

The deadlock is the most common type of storefront door lock. It is easy to identify a deadlock because it uses a thick laminated steel straight bolt. The heavy duty straight bolt projects 1-3/8" from the lock body for maximum security. The thick laminated steel of the deadlock makes it impossible for potential forced entry by cutting with a hacksaw or prying with a crow bar. Deadlocks are designed for use on swinging storefront doors and are not used on sliding storefront doors. For these reasons deadlocks are preferred storefront door lock choice for the majority of storefront doors.


Deadlock Components

A storefront door lock is comprised of a rectangular lock body which houses a straight bolt. At the top of the lock body chassis is a threaded mortise lock cylinder hole on each side of the lock body. This is where the mortise lock cylinder or mortise lock thumbturn can be threaded in. On the face of the deadlock is where the straight bolt projects outward. The deadlock face is designed to have a faceplate attached to it. The deadlock body is designed to be mortised into the storefront door's lock stile.



How A Deadlock Works

The most common storefront door deadlock set up is when a key mortise lock cylinder is threaded on the exterior side of the storefront door deadlock, and on the interior side is a thumbturn mortise lock cylinder. When a key is inserted into the key mortise lock cylinder and rotated clockwise 360 degrees, it causes the straight bolt from the deadlock body to project outward into the "locked" position. This occurs because on the backside of the mortise lock cylinder is a cam which rotates according to how much the key in the lock cylinder is turned. As the cam rotates it strikes and pushes against a pin. This pin is commonly referred to as a pivot pin because it is attached to the straight bolt, and as the pin moves it pivots the straight bolt outward towards the locked position. So as the key turns, the cam rotates and pushes against the pivot pin, projecting the straight bolt out of the lock body. When the key is turned a full 360 degrees then the cam has fully pushed the pivot pin in the locked position, and the straight bolt is fully engaged in the lock position.

It is important to note that in order for the storefront door deadlock to be completely locked, the pivot pin that the cam pushes against must be fully engaged and seated. This means the key must turn a full 360 degrees. If the key is only turned 300 degrees, then the pivot pin is not pushed far enough to be seated in the lock position. Although the straight bolt is projected from the deadlock body, it is not actually secured in the lock position. If you were to push down on the straight bolt, it would move freely. The key must be turned 360 degrees so that the cam pushes the pivot pin and seats it in the engaged or locked position.

When the straight bolt projects out and approaches the fully engaged lock position, it goes into a receiving hole located in the door frame. Once the deadlock is in the locked position the straight bolt is completely projected deep into the door frame, securing the door from moving. To unlock the door and return the straight bolt back into the deadlock body, the key can simply be rotated 360 degrees counter-clockwise. The process is the exact same when locking or unlocking the door using the thumbturn lock cylinder. The only difference is you are rotating a thumbturn rather than a key.

Deadlock Faceplates

Deadlocks feature 5 types of faceplates to choose from: Flat, radius, bevel right, bevel left, and radius weather strip. The flat and radius weatherstrip faceplates are what you most commonly see on storefront doors. Bevel right or left face plates are typically only used on storefront door lock stiles that are beveled.

Hookbolt

Essentially a hookbolt lock is a type of deadlock. It operates and functions exactly the same as the deadlock with the main difference being the shape of the bolt. On a deadlock the bolt is a straight bolt, but on a hook bolt the bolt is shaped like a hook. Hookbolts also vary from deadlocks with it's application. Hookbolts are designed for use on sliding storefront doors, not swinging storefront doors. For this reason hook bolts are the preferred choice on storefront automatic sliding doors.



Deadlatch Lock

A deadlatch lock uses a spring loaded latch bolt design to maintain security. Deadlatch locks are primarily used in applications that require after hour applications, where pedestrians can freely exit the building, however pedestrians are unable to enter the building without a key. For example, a medical office door would be great application for a deadlatch lock. During normal business hours, the door can remain unlocked and customers can pass through the door freely. During after hours the door can be locked, and only authorized employees with keys can enter the building. Anyone inside of the building can still exit the door while maintaining security with a locked door.



Deadlatch Components

A deadlatch lock is comprised of a lock body which houses the spring loaded latchbolt. On the exterior side of the deadlock is a threaded mortise lock cylinder hole designed for installation of a keyed mortise lock cylinder. On the interior side of the deadlock is cylinder hole designed for installing a push paddle or lever handle. The deadlatch face is designed to have a faceplate attached to it. The deadlatch lock body is designed to be mortised into the storefront door's lock stile.



How A Deadlatch Lock Works

A standard deadlatch installation includes a keyed mortise cylinder on the outside of the door and a push paddle on the inside of the door. When the door is in the closed position the deadlatch spring loaded latchbolt is projected and mated into the door frame receiving strike hole, allowing the door to be secure. When a pedestrian exits the building and pushes on the push paddle, it rotates the cam plug on the backside of the push paddle which is connected to the deadlatch body. As the push paddle is depressed, the cam plug pushes against the pivot pin of the deadlatch retracting the spring loaded latch bolt. As long as the push paddle is fully depressed then the latchbolt is retracted. If the push paddle is released, the latchbolt will project back out. The keyed mortise cylinder on the outside of the door operates the same way except that in order to depress the spring loaded latchbolt, a key must be inserted in the deadlatch and rotated.

Conclusion

A deadlock is the standard storefront door lock and provides security with a laminated heavy duty steel bolt. A hookbolt is a storefront door lock used on a sliding door such as a storefront automatic sliding door. Hookbolts provide security through a hook shaped lock bolt. A deadlatch is a type of storefront door lock with a spring loaded latchbolt. Deadlatch locks are used on storefront doors that require after hours exit only operation. If you are in need of high quality and secure storefront door locks, we recommend Tahoma storefront door locks. Tahoma is the #1 brand of storefront door hardware and their locks are universal with all brands and makes of storefront doors. Shop today and receive FAST, FREE shipping!






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